Evicting the Troublesome Lodger in Victorian England

At the recent Social History Society online conference, a question was posed to me as to how easy it was to evict a lodger from one’s home in Victorian England. The answer this appears to be variable. Certainly, those vulnerable could find themselves rapidly dislodged upon the whim of their landlord or landlady, with little,Continue reading “Evicting the Troublesome Lodger in Victorian England”

‘Rip the feather bed open’: Domestic Violence and Working-Class Marriage in Victorian England

The week’s episode of A House Through Time ventures out of 10 Guinea Street to follow the story of its former maid-of-all-work, Hester, who upon leaving service found herself trapped in a violent marriage. For many such women, in a society that largely tolerated marital violence (to a point), their stories, like Hester’s, only comeContinue reading “‘Rip the feather bed open’: Domestic Violence and Working-Class Marriage in Victorian England”

The ‘”Healthy” Metal Bedstead?

It has been while since I last wrote a blog post. Indeed, since my last post I have had a baby who is now a toddler. After exploring the life cycle of working-class marriage in the Victorian era through the beds they inhabited in my Palgrave Pivot In Bed with the Victorians, I am nowContinue reading “The ‘”Healthy” Metal Bedstead?”

‘Why Charlotte?’ Unanswered Questions in the Inquests

Coroners’ inquests – both the surviving records and ensuing newspaper reports – are an invaluable source in opening up the homes of the Victorian working-classes. Through coroners’ meticulous investigations and the press fascination of all things death related, I have been able to uncover intimate details of domestic life and pry into the private spaceContinue reading “‘Why Charlotte?’ Unanswered Questions in the Inquests”